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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 916 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >>> after weeks of controversy, resignation and arrests, britain's "news of the world" published its last issue yesterday, sunday. the final issue of the british tabloid reading, thank you and good-bye. it comes as explosive new allegations come to light about the phone-hacking scandal surrounding the paper. the rival "the mirror" reports today a new york city reports "news of the world" asked for voice mail of 9/11 victims. the report says the tabloid wanted phone numbers and details of calls leading up to the terror attacks almost a decade ago. nbc's anabel reports on the demise. >> reporter: rupert murdoch arrived in london to oversee the crisis threatening his media empire in britain. on the road to his headquarters he enjoyed one last read of the newspaper he closed down last week. "thank you and good-bye" screamed the front page. it was britain's biggest selling paper with an unbeaten record for exposing corruption but the tables have turned and it is now being investigated following allegations of police bribery and widespread hacking of personal voice mails. few of the current sta
, news international closes britain's best-selling paper after a run of 168 years. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> medical breakthroughs. for the first time, scientists have been able to make an organ out of synthetic materials. and will we have lived off? the end of an era is almost here for the -- lift off? the end of an era is almost here for the space program, but it all depends on mother nature. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. is the hacking scandal which has stunned britain, and it today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, the news of the world, has been shut down. it has been in print since the 1800's. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitabl
and scheduled to depart by the end of this year. >>> britain's defunct "news of the world" tabloid it's reported may have hacked into the phones of 9/11 victims. "news of the world" reporters said they would pay him to get the private numbers of 9/11 victims, he declined. the last issue of the 168-year-old paper rolled off the presses yesterday, brought down by a growing hacking scandal. several staffers face jail time, meanwhile rupert murdoch the paper' owner is deep in damage control. elizabeth palmer reports. >> reporter: rupert murdoch arrived in london, conspicuously reading a copy of his notorious cameras, then smiled for the cameras as he went out for dinner with rebekah brooks his embattled ceo. the scandal has cost him one of his most profitable papers. staff leaving "news of the world" for the last time put a brave face on the murdoch decision to shut it down. the "news of the world" was the best selling newspaper in britain, a cheeky blend of skin, scandal and gotcha journalism, scarily aimed at british working people who enjoyed seeing the rich and the powerful taken down a peg or t
two front page side by side lengthy stories about something going on in britain. to do that otherwise, you would need the queen to abdicate and the plague to hit london. clearly there's a political agenda at work here. >> the testimony from the murdoches and the testimony from rebecca brooks, coverage as we said, both, here in the states and of course in the u.k. all the cable news networks on fox, on it in its entirety, no commercial breaks. do you think that the coverage was warranted, was it fair? >> was the coverage important in that it's the most important thing going on in the world, it's not. rupert murdoch and a lot of people have a lot of interest in it, yes. people want to see is this the thing that takes rupert murdoch down and you see this idea that somehow they're going to prove something that happened in this one isolated incident is actually happening everywhere else. that's what the coverage is really about, i think, is trying to blow it into something more than what it actually was. >> jon: jim, a lot of people out there would have loved to have seen some sort of a go
closes britain's best-selling paper after a run of 168 years. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> medical breakthroughs. for the first time, scientists have been able to make an organ out of synthetic materials. and will we have lived off? the end of an era is almost here for the -- lift off? the end of an era is almost here for the space program, but it all depends on mother nature. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. is the hacking scandal which has stunned britain, and it today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, the news of the world, has been shut down. it has been in print since the 1800's. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitable pride and
the role of first lady. >>> britain's newest royal couple, william and catherine are in california today, from ponies to celebrities, it promises to be a very busy day. >>> and the final shuttle has been launched into space. we will look ahead to what's next for nasa. >>> we begin this morning with the death of former first lady betty ford. she was 93 years old. ford was surrounded by family when she passed away last night. she became first lady back in 1974 when her husband gerald ford took over following the resignation of richard nixon. her greatest legacy may be the contribution she made against the battle against addiction. here what is president obama had to say about her passing. he says today we take comfort in the knowledge that betty and her husband former president gerald ford are together once more. michele and i send our thoughts and prayers to their children, michael, john, steven and susan. and this from flansy reagan. i was deeply saddened this afternoon when i heard of betty ford's death. she has been an inspiration to so many through her efforts to educate women about b
their fury at what happened. last week, let's remember, this was the biggest selling pap ner britain with an unrivaled reputation for journalistic scoop spots. the press itself fell silent this morning for the final time. and this is the last edition. so it has been a very long week on what we call fleet street here in britain. it's also been a very uncomfortable week for media boss rupert murdoch. >> reporter: for millions in britain, sunday morning involves a walk to the news agent to pick up "news of the world." a ritual their parents, grandparents, even great grandparents would recognize. but with thank you and good-bye, today is their last chance. the 168-year-old tabloid that thrived on scandal and exposie ing hypocrisy has itself been destroyed by a scandal of its own. the paper is being investigated for paying police for information and allegation of voice mail hacking. one paper has dubbed this britain's watergate. there is questions about standards in british journalism have been raised. three people have been arrested including the paper's former editor, once a key aide to
britain's corridors of power. brooks is answering police questions. >> reporter: in the cozy world of british politics and media, rebecca brooks was at its very center. she wined and dined the rich and powerful on behalf of her boss and mentor, rupert murdoch. brooks first came to news international as a secretary at "news of the world." she quickly developed a reputation for her tenacity as a journalist, reportedly once disguising herself as a cleaning lady to scoop a competitor. described as both ruthless and charming, she was soon the youngest editor of the "news of the world," and shortly after "the sun," both named by murdoch's news international. she spearheaded a controversial campaign to, quote, name and shame alleged pedophiles, publishing their names and addresses in the paper. as the editor of "the sun," brooks testified to parliament that her paper had paid police officers for information. and it was under her editorship that the "news of the world" allegedly paid a private investigator to hack into the voicemail messages of millie doweller, the 13-year-old girl murdere
that country and keep britain and britain safe from another 9/11 or 7/7. thousands more including many civilians have risked their lives and hundreds have been injured fighting for the security of our nation. they were called to an international coalition involving 48 countries with a specific you and mandate working at the invitation of a democratically elected government. though there have been many difficult times we should be clear about what has been achieved. in 2009 my predecessor, the prime minister told this house that some three quarters of this serious terrorist plots against britain linked afghanistan and pakistan. we must always be on guard. i am advised this figure is significantly reduced. international forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its hea
range. >>> there is new fallout from britain's phone scandal that is threatening rupert murdoch's media empire. murdock is in london trying to do some damage control. >> reporter: media mogul rupert murdoch faced a mob of reporters easy met with his embattled ceo, rebecca brooks, in london. british police will question her later this week about the phone hacking cover-up that happened on her watch. cameras caught murdock reading sunday's final edition of the news of the world. the paper ended a 168-year run after news broke that journalists were hacking the phones of murder and terrorism victims for stories. >> there will have to be some kind of massive, massive clearout of the stables really. it just looks terrible. >> reporter: london's "daily mirror" tabloid is hitting murdock with more claims of corruption involving 9-11 victims. the paper quotes an ex-new york city cop saying news of the world reporters offered to pay him for phone records of the dead. the phone hacking scandal boiled over last week with a case of milly dowler, a british team murdered in 2002. her parents met with
for retiring space shuttle "atlantis." >> julian assange takes his case to britain's high court. will a judge block his extradition to speeden? i'm tina kraus in london. i'll have the story coming up. >>> rupert murdoch's news corp. shares fell 5% when news came of the company's buyout was being delayed. the media company continues to deal with fallout stemming from the hacking scandal that shut down its tabloid "news of the world." >>> regulators will take six months to decide whether to sign off on the buyout as the probe into phone hacking continues. >>> julian assange is back in a british courtroom. appealing his extradition to sweden. i've seen the krause report, the wikileaks founder insists that the sex allegations against him are politically motivated. >> reporter: wikileaks founder julian assange made his way through a crush of media to fight his latest legal battle at britain's high court. assange's lawyers are trying to block his extradition to sweden where he's wanted on sexual assault allegations. they say sweden's case against assange is flawed. the australian computer whiz is
applications for similar cases against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the pape
against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite, quite shoc
to be suspicious suggesting it was a suicide. this scandal is rocking britain but seems ready to explode here in the united states. the fbi investigating whether a news corp journalist tried to hack into the phones of 9/11 victims and survivors. calls in congress for a investigation. the fbi also says it's aware of reports that actor jude law's phone was hacked while he was in new york. the scandal shows no sign of slowing down. quite the contrary. possibly being replaced as the ceo of his own media empire. a man whose customer base is the whole world. anyone who watches "glee" or reads the "wall street journal" or anyone that goes to the movies or reads books. we have jeffrey toobin and matthew chance. and brian stelter. brian, we'll start with you, rupert murdoch stepping down in the world of media, that's a wow. true or maybe? >> right now it's a maybe. news corp will not deny the bloomberg report on the record. what they say on background, people around the company say there was no meeting today to talk about it. you can tell that's not a real denial. they may want this out here before th
television in britain. the business consequences of this scandal are still unfolding, but the legal consequences started unfolding years ago. in 2007, a "news of the world" editor and private investigator hired by the paper were jailed for the phone hacking. the editor, andy coulson denied knowing about the hacking but resigned anyway. david cameron then hired that editor, andy coulson, to be a communications director for them. last week he and another editor were arrested for hacking and bribery charges. told about the involvement in the scandal at the time cameron was hiring him. cameron announced an official inquiry. >> after listening carefully, we've decided the best way to proceed is with one inquiry, but in two parts. i can tell the house this inquiry will be led by one of the most senior judges in this country and under the 2005 inquiries act. newspaper reporters, management, pro -- barbara boxer, jay rockefeller and bob menendez have all called for investigations by the justice department and securities and exchange commission. the senators say they want to know if american
"atlantis," the final launch of the nasa shuttle program. >> brown: britain's "news of the world" scandal expands, and ray suarez explores its impact on both journalism and politics. >> lehrer: tom bearden has the latest on the exxon pipeline rupture that gushed thousands of gallons of crude oil into a montana river. >> it's been a week since the silver tip pipeline released oil into the yellowstone river. but it may be months before they know how much damage is actually been done. >> brown: and david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> well, the best companies are driven by new ideas. >> our future depends on new ideas. we spend billions on advanced technologies. >> it's all about investing in the future. >> we can find new energy-- more cleaner, safer and smarter. >> collaborating with the best in the field. >> chevron works with the smartest people at leading universities and tech companies. >> and yet, it's really basic. >> it's paying off every day. the william a
will continue into great britain. this a major setback, though, for the rupert murdoch empire, though you heard richard quest saying perhaps, perhaps he sees money to be made here. that's all for right now. hope to see you back tomorrow night. "in the arena" starts right now. >>> good evening. welcome to the program. i'm tom foreman. shock waves are rolling through the media world tonight over what looks like a criminal enterprise operating inside of a newsroom. high-profile figures targeted for a gangster style roundup, and all of it taking place under the leadership of one of the richest and most powerful men in america. it sounds like a hollywood thriller, but this is real life, it's playing out in london, and sending tremors all the way to american shores. rupert murdoch, the owner of fox news, 20th century fox, the "new york post," and a number of other vast media powerhouses is under fire tonight, hours after he took the dramatic step of abruptly closing down one of his biggest tabloid newspapers. it is called "the news of the world," and it is at the center of a scandal that just keeps g
control as there is flu fallout from britain's phone hacking scandal threatening his media empire. >> media mogul rupert murdoch faced a mob of reporters as he met with his em battled c.e.o. rebecca brooks in london. british police will question her later this week about the phone hacking coverup that happened on her watch. cameras caught murdoch reading sunday's final edition of the "news of the world." the paper ended a 168-year run after news broke that journalists were hacking into phones of murder and terrorism victims for stories. >> there will have to be some kind of massive clearout of the stables really. it just looks terrible. >> london's daily mirror tabloid is hitting murdoch with more claims of corruption involving 9/11 victims. the paper quotes an ex-new york city cop saying news of the world reporters offered to pay him for phone records of the dead. the phone hacking scandal boiled over last week with the case of millie doweller, a british teen murdered in 2002. her parents met with britain's deputy prime minister monday. police say journalists from news of the wor
. >> just ahead, in london, britain prime minister defends his record and his staff after hugh granted wins a legal victory involving a tabloid. >> up next, you'll never believe what a new survey uncovered about disabled parking placards issued by california. (s(speaking g in internanational language) and he said un tm go ye into all of the world and preach the gospel preach the gospel  ♪very creature in the world. (applause) >>> investor carl icahn is raising his offer for clorox. it's now $10.7 billion or $80 a share that is more than his initial bid. the first bid was rejected a couple days ago. i con says he believes shareholders should decide whether to accept the offer. clorox acknowledged they got an offer and reviewing it. >> the department of motor vehicles says 60,000 of more than 2 million disabled parking placards may be sent to dead people. they conduct records every two years and it misses many of those people. overall one-third placards are being used illegally. >>> the latest rounds of debt talks are set to begin at the nation's capital in less than an hour. p
wife pleaded guilty and goes to prison. >>> the final copy of britain oppose the biggest tabloid hit the newsstands. the news of the world's issued a full-page apology. its owner rupert murdoch is in london trying to handle the crisis around his media empire. the sunday times reports more arrests are expected over the telephones hacking scandal. >>> nasa is word a piece of space junk may, close to atlantis and the international space station. the space junk is expected to make its closest approach on tuesday as the astronauts will be conducting a spacewalk. the shuttle crew will spend the next week on loading 7,000 pounds of equipment and supplies for the international space station. >>> will and kate's no american tour is over. how was your first trip to the u.s.? >> thank you very much. >> after spending nine days in canada, they wrapped up their three-day stay in california. they visited zero in los angeles and then an inner-city academy of arts and participated in a polo match. then they stopped at a jobs fair for america -- for unemployed veterans. >> this is the last stop on ou
on. >> default, get it over with. >> we came up celebrating great britain. but next, a new book at how britain played a crucial role in the american civil war. stay with us. we'll have that with more "morning joe." ♪♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ look at that car, well, it goes fast ♪ ♪ givin' my dad a heart attack ♪ [ friend ] that is so awesome. ♪ i love my car [ engine revving ] [ male announcer ] that first chevy, yea, it gets under your skin. ♪ >>> 40 past the hour. welcome back to "morning joe." joining us, award-winning historian and internationally best-selling author, amanda foreman. she's out now with a new book, "a world on fire." britain's crucial role in the american civil war. i love the back story. what a woman. today's woman. it took her ten years to write this book? >> ten years. she had five kids along the way. >> that's busy. >> that's impressive. >> to say the least. >> got in the book a tad bit. >> tell us about the book that has an amazing cast of characters. >> 197 characters, mostly men. system of the women are so great that they stand out. my favorite is th
are swept up in britain's phone hacking scandal. >>> concert chaos, thousands run for safety when a stage collapses. in ottawa. >>> and in hiding, casey anthony gets out of jail and out of sight. captioning funded by cbs >>> and good morning, everyone. appreciate you joining us. i'm terrell brown in for betty nguyen. it's turning into the scandal that just won't quit. the voice mail hacking and police bribery investigation that's rocked england is snowballing. the latest this morning, britain's top police official, the head of scotland yard, has resigned, and the well-connected former chief executive of rupert murdoch's news international has been arrested. elizabeth palmer rorz. >> reporter: rebekah brooks had willingly made an appointment to go to the police station to answer questions when she arrived, she was arrested. anything she tells detectives now will become a formal part of the criminal inquiry into phone hacking and bribery of the "news of the world." brooks' arrest came as a surprise, but this was a shock. >> i have this afternoon informed the palace, secretary and the mayor
. thank you, ashley. >>> just ahead on "the morning news" a cell phone hacking scandal grows in britain. >>> plus this looks something from "the mummy" but it's not the sahara, but it's actually arizona. >>> first scott pelley has a preview of tonight's "cbs evening news." >>> they helped win the race to space but now they're losing their jobs. the end of a career for nasa workers from astronauts to mechanics. where do they go from here? find out tonight on the "cbs evening news." >>> "cbs moneywatch" sponsored by vagisil, introducing vagisil wash with odor block, the confident clean. l, introducing vagisil wash with odor block, the confident clean. as i get older, i'm making changes to support my metabolism. i'm more active, i eat right, and i switched to one a day women's active metabolism, a complete women's multivitamin, plus more -- for metabolism support. and that's a change i feel good about. [ female announcer ] from one a day. [ dramatic soundtrack plays ] whoa! man: what is that? i don't know, but it burns! it's like fire. woman: ow, ow! i can't see. man: it's singeing me! it'
is very much in britain. >> there's no shortage of people in the american media establishment and the american political establishment who have taken issue with the fact that the properties, fox news and the "new york post" have done business. that said, we've got to be careful. usually you don't want to get ahead of yourselves. in this one the story has each time surpassed your wildest expectations in the past two weeks. >> happened again this morning. >> absolutely right. i would say in terms of the american implications there's a question of whether british journalists for news corp broke the law here in 9/11. the evidence is scant. if the attorney general were to issue a wider ranging investigations, even actions that were illegal taken, for example, in great britain could reflect on the ability of news corp to hold on to american broadcasting licenses here. you could see repercussions under the question of the they interpreted as foreign officials being bribed as has been alleged with some substantive hearings. >> once you start an investigation, your don't know what kind
-cutting bill aimed at averting default today, while in britain thousands of public sector workers went on strike rallying against pension reforms. good evening. i'm jeffrey brown. >> warner: and i'm margaret warner. on the "newshour" tonight, we look at whether austerity measures can work to spur economic growth and help solve the european debt crisis. >> brown: then, we have a newsmaker interview with white house chief of staff bill daley about the stalled debt talks, a day after the president scolded congress. >> warner: betty ann bowser reports on a colorado hospital where medical mistakes are rare. >> one in three americans are at risk of a hospital acquired infection or will become a victim of a medical error. this hospital in denver is doing something about that. >> brown: ray suarez explores the prospect of another tech bubble. this time from social media websites. >> warner: and we get a rare view of dissent in china, following a new surge of protests by young people and labor union members. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newshour
, for example. but in great britain, this reaches a whole other level. in a moment, i'll be talking about all of this with a couple of keen observers. but first, a look at some of the other stories i'll be drilling down on tonight. >>> obama under fire. they say he's too quick to cave, and that's the democrats talking. >> do not consider social security a piggy bank for giving tax cuts to the wealthiest people in our country. >>> and the last shuttle flight, as it roars into space, it leaves behind one small american town and a love affair 30 years in the making. >>> then, he's conducted over 40,000 interview interviews, on first-name basis with everybody, including a wizard named harry. that rhymes with larry. e.d. hill talks with the king, live. >>> we have so much going on tonight. but let's get back to our top story first, because it's impossible to overstate the impact of this. this is the most widely read english newspaper on the planet, and it's under the leadership of an american media tycoon, and now it is publishing its last page on sunday, going out of business after more than a ce
and connie britain, also up for honors "modern family" led the pack among comedies, including best comedy. also in the chase for that award are the "big bang cheetheory" "" "the office" "30 rock" and "parks and recreation". steve car rel has yet to win an award. among his competitors, matt le blank in his comedy "episodes." marc barger, nbc news. >>> the buzz is building for something that rock and roll hasn't seen in a long time. the super group. >> yeah, the group, this band is called super heavy. mick jagger, dave stewart, josh stone, ar raman who won oscars. the first cast of characters that formed the band, rock, regular reggae, pop and soul. a tour is due out this september. >> can't wait to hear it. >>> coming up on news4, a scientific break through that's giving dentists and their patients a reason to smile. >>> and why this man is wearing a pasta strainer on his driver's license photo. the answer is coming up. >>> and for all of your news, be sure to follow news4 online. just search nbc was noirm now, this is more like it. >> yeah. >> just want it to hang on, right? at least for
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 916 (some duplicates have been removed)